What is Digital Citizenship?

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What is Digital Citizenship?

Digital Citizenship is the practice of using the Internet and technology safely, respectfully and responsibly.

  • The practice of using the Internet and technology safely, respectfully and responsibly
  • Best practices for responsible technology use
  • Techniques and strategies for responsible use of social media and technology
  • The ability to think critically and discern what is positive to share online and what should be kept private
  • Protecting private information, respecting yourself and others, staying safe online, giving proper credit when using someone else’s work, and balancing time spent online and offline

Digital Citizenship in the news

We all need to work together to develop and enforce digital citizenship norms that make social media platforms hospitable for everyone. –The New York Times

  • “We all need to work together to develop and enforce digital citizenship norms that make social media platforms hospitable for everyone.”The New York Times
  • “All educators have a responsibility to address digital citizenship.”The Guardian
  • “Digital citizenship education is essential for all, especially the young.”Huffington Post
  • “One of the best methods of building digital citizenship is to begin early.”Chicago Tribune
  • “Teach [students] to be their own self-advocates, to self-regulate, to achieve balance and about what it means to be a good digital citizen.”Huffington Post
  • “Kids need a national Digital Citizenship curriculum”VentureBeat

Questions to ask younger kids

  1. Is it ok to share my password with my BFF?
  2. Is it ok for me to talk with people online who my parents don’t know?
  3. If I see bullying online, and I click “like/heart” on that post, does that mean I’m bullying also?
  4. If I see something bad online, who should I tell?

When should your student be public?

Ages 0-13 – Should have an entirely private online presence
Ages 14-15 – Start having a family discussion regarding what should be public
Age 15 – Consider posting some positive images and volunteer photos on social media
Age 17 – Colleges should be able to find a positive online footprint for your student

 Parents: Learn about our new Parent/Student Social Media Bootcamp event 

Digital Citizenship 3 step plan

  1. Audit your student’s online image – Use Google to see what’s out there
  2. Dialog with your student about their future (and where they want to go)
  3. Create content to improve their online image – Make content that is congruent with their college application

Why should parents care about Digital Citizenship?

College admission officers and employers review applicants’ digital footprints, so it’s essential to ensure you have a positive online image.

  • The consequences of making a mistake online can lead to dangerous situations
  • College admission officers and employers review applicants’ digital footprints, so it’s essential to ensure you have a positive online image
  • Students may be unaware that social networking sites and apps could be sharing their personal information with third parties
  • Access to technology increases the chance of your student being exposed to inappropriate content
  • A lack of balance between screen time and time spent offline can lead to sleep deprivation
  • Teens who spend a lot of time on social media tend to rely on social validation which has a negative effect on their self-esteem

How to become a good Digital Citizen

If you’re a Teen (and have your parents permission): Consider creating a LinkedIn, YouTube and Google+ to positively impact your digital footprint on Google.

  • Parents: Take time with students and go through all of their past social media images
  • Delete inappropriate images or posts that may not represent your current maturity level
  • Use one profile photo across all social media accounts, so you are easily identifiable
  • If you’re a Teen (and have your parents’ permission): Consider creating a LinkedIn, YouTube and Google+ account under your real name. These will positively impact your digital footprint on Google
  • On your Google+, YouTube and LinkedIn accounts, add links to websites where your achievements are featured, such as a school website, or team sports website
  • Use your full name (including middle) in the bio sections
  • List school, hobbies, awards and sports accomplishments in your account descriptions
  • Highlight volunteer and extracurricular activities
  • When posting photos online, consider including your city name and school name in some of the bios or captions below the photos to make sure those are discovered by Google

Before posting anything online, ask yourself:

  1. Will this post help (or hurt) my chances of my dream college accepting me to my dream major?
  2. How would I feel if this post was shown publicly to my peers, neighbors, or to my relatives?
Social Media Bootcamp for Parents & Teens 450
Digital Citizenship Conference for Educators 450
Social Media Safety Webinar for Parents 450

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